About

Biography

Lucy Glendinning born 1964 lives and works in Somerset.

Studied fine art sculpture at University of the West of England Bristol, after leaving college Lucy worked for Elizabeth Frink in a bronze foundry, Learning how to make molds and castings with wax which influenced her work to this day.

Lucy has exhibited in extensively in Europe, in USA, and Asia, has representation in Europe. Regularly exhibiting at art fairs and in museums. Including the Ashmolean Museum, Royal Academy London , Grand Rapids Art Museum, USA,  Abbaye Saint-Riquier, , La Halle Saint Peirre Museum, Paris, and Halle14, Leipzic, Centre d’art Contemporaian, France, Boras Museum of Modern Art, Sweden, Meymac France, and Meijer Sculpture Gardens USA and The Saatchi Gallery London.

Lucy has completed eleven public commissions throughout the UK, which have won several awards including The Civic Trust Award in 2009, and 2011, the Landscape Institute Award in 2010 and 2011, and a ‘Red Rose award’ in 2011.

Recently in 2018 Lucy has had a solo exhibition at Da-End Gallery in Paris and a large exhibition at Villa Tamaris Museum of Contemporary Art in Toulon, curated by Evelyne Auraud. Also, in group exhibitions Kalmar Konstmuseum, Chateau du Rivau, Chatue De Maison and is currently exhibiting at Museum Kranenburgh.

Statement

My sculpture takes the human form as its starting point and its tool.

My point of departure is not an idiosyncratic impulse but a reflection, a thought fuelled by my interest in new philosophical questions, medical information or psychological studies.   I do not start from an artistic compulsion, fantasy or pure imagination but develop a reflection – through research and exploration – in search of an experience to solicit the viewer/ spectator/ visitor/ art lover.

Not to make a statement but to ask a question to provoke a debate or curiosity. Through sparking conscious thoughts and ideas as well as evoking emotions and empathy through our subconscious.

I am drawn to the visceral nature of sculpture, how it can occupy a space – change the feel of the space it occupies. My work is derived from research and exploration into the human condition and our possible futures.

I believe an artwork has the potential to inspire self-awareness, enhancing a sense of humanity and promoting a concern for the wider society, and in doing so define a cultural and historical context.

I have a classical approach to the manipulation of materials and look to use craft to help draw and engage the viewer to experience the sculpture or installation.

The quality of craftsmanship, and the way in which a sculpture becomes inseparable from its situation and how a viewer will respond to it are paramount concerns in my work.

My ideas start as a poem or short statement; they are often derived and inspired by philosophical questions, medical information or psychological studies. For example, I am currently working on a series of pieces looking at how genetic engineering might enable us to bend the human form to our own will and how we should react to this possibility with its implications of a world of ever greater divisions between rich and poor.

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